Almost by definition, adventure travel puts you outside of your comfort zone.  Frankly, I think the best experiences do.  But often leaving your comfort zone can mean fear and anxiety.

 Let’s look at the top reasons adventure travel (or even ANY travel) can make you anxious, worried or afraid, and how you can mitigate those fears you, too, can feel the exhilaration, confidence and empowerment that comes from adventure travel. 

What are the Top Ten Fears Holding you Back from Traveling?

 

1. What if I can’t do it? 

This is definitely a good question to ask yourself.  The key is to match up your abilities to an adventure.  Just go +1.  For example, if you’ve never hiked before, choose an adventure that has a base camp rather than a linear hike that you MUST accomplish on a set schedule.  Hiked a 100 mile trail in your country, consider doing one in a country that doesn’t speak English.  The idea is to incrementally step outside your comfort zone.  And make sure you train.

 2. What if I get hurt? 

This is always a possibility.  Most often people get hurt when they’ve let their guard down or are tired.  At the end of the day, pay attention to lifting your feet up so you don’t trip on a root.  Use trekking poles.  My poles have saved me from countless falls.  If you are in an area that you think you could fall, lean toward the direction you prefer to fall, so if you do, you can fall more safely, say on your butt.  And like my sister, Terry, said in the last episode, I fell.  And you know what? The sky didn't fall down and I was OK. I just got a little muddy. “

  • Use trekking poles when hiking and all recommended safety gear on other activities (yes that means wearing PFDs when on the water, helmets when on a bike, etc.).
  • Keep a small emergency kit in your pack with a tube of antibiotic cream, a bandage, some blister care, Vitamin I (Ibuprophen) and a compression sock in case you sprain an ankle (listen why here).
  • Buy travel insurance. Make sure it covers your adventure activity and offers evacuation in addition to normal coverages.

3. I’m afraid of criminals. 

In all cities of the world today, you need to take normal precautions.  I put a link to the helpful State Dept travel webpage for each country in the free Travel Planners that correspond to each episode.

  • Hide money three places:
    • Small cash readily available in a pocket
    • About $50 in purse or backpack
    • Hide your passport, credit cards and real cash underneath your clothing.
  • Listen to the hairs on your neck and don’t be afraid to make a scene if you feel uncomfortable
  • Don’t put yourself in a vulnerable position.
  • Don’t walk alone at night when no one is around
  • Always watch your drink
  • Consider a group tour so you are always with a local guide and other people
  • Check into the areas you are going so you can avoid troublesome areas (ask locals too!)
  • Learn about local scams by checking this State Dept link for your destination

Here's a neat trick to learn a foreign phrase: DRAW it- the more ridiculous the better – to help you remember a foreign language. The foreign language sounds might mean nothing to you but if you associate the sounds with something you know and can peg it to, you can remember it visually. Listen to the podcast to see how I learned THai for “Can you speak English”.

4. I can’t speak the local language. 

If you’re listening to this podcast, you are blessed to know the world’s international language.  You can almost ALWAYS find someone who speaks a little English.  If not, pantomimimg is fun! 

  • Or find a teenager. They often can help. 
  • You can download Google translate to your phone and use it offline.
  • Take the time to learn at least “please, thank you, where’s the bathroom, yes, no, hello, goodbye”. It will endear you to the locals.  YouTube is a fabulous free resource for picking up key travel phrases.  (See below for how to learn phrases easier)
  • Alternatively, you can stick to English speaking countries or places where almost everyone speaks English. That still gives you tons of options.
  • Or, you can go on a guided tour. Your guide will speak the local language and English.

5. I don’t have anyone to travel with. 

PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE don’t let that stop you!  Solo travelers make up a HUGE and growing portion of the adventure travel community, particularly women over 50.  Whether you are single like myself or your partner doesn’t like adventure travel, you will meet plenty of fellow travelers and will often make lifelong friends. 

  • If you are worried you’ll be lonely, go on a guided tour. I promise you will bond with your fellow travelers.  Sometimes you will have to pay a single supplement.  If you don’t want to pay it, some companies will match you up with the same sex roommate.
  • If you wait until you find a travel mate, you may never go. Just pick an adventure and book it!  You won’t be sorry!

6. I don’t like roughing it. 

No problem!  Nowadays there are lots of great adventures that end each day in a comfy bed.  You can use the search bar above to narrow your options to those with the comfort level you prefer

7. I’m worried I’ll get lost. 

Did you know that you can use Google Maps offline?  When I get to a new location, I ‘pin’ my accommodation so I can always find my way back home.  I also carry a business card of the hotel or at least make a note of the address in my phone that I can show a driver if need be.

  • In the wild, you need to pay attention. I recommend a guide in areas you could conceivably get lost on an unmarked trail, like in my Nicaragua adventure Episode 001.  But most trails are very well marked, or ‘blazed”. 
  • If I come to an intersection and am not sure which way to go, I do two things. First, I choose a direction and then make a mark on the trail with rocks and/or sticks to indicate which direction I plan to go.  Then I turn around to see what the trail looks like behind me and look at the trail indicator I just made.  So if I decide later that I guessed wrong, which is generally happens in less than 100 yards, I turn around and can readily find my intersection again so I can head the other way.  You would be surprised how often you can miss a fork when you come from a different direction, so my method helps me to self-correct and not miss the turn off. 
  • Also there aren’t many popular trails these days that you won’t see other people. If you’re really concerned about getting lost, purposefully CHOOSE a popular one and then in the popular direction, not like Rosemary Burris in Episode 005 who went in the opposite direction of most folks hiking the Kungsleden Trail so that she could have the trail to herself for much of the day.
  • There are also great map apps you can put on your phone. But as a backup, I also always carry a compass and a paper map in case my phone dies.  If the paper map is not waterproof, I make it so by watering down some Elmer’s Glue and paint over it completely.  Once dry, I turn it over and repeat on the other side.  When both sides are dry, sprinkle them with baby powder to help keep the map from sticking when you fold it.  This technique works on Xerox copies as well.
  • It’s also smart to put a whistle on your pack and carry a headlamp.

8. I'm worried I’ll get sick

It happens. You eat something that disagrees with you.  I pack a couple of Oral Rehydration packet to help with rehydration, and gratefully I’ve never had to use them.   You just mix the packet with water so you aren’t carrying around water weight. 

  • I am careful about what I eat and drink, especially in second or third world countries.

 In those countries, I only eat cooked food, fruits I can peel, and eat at popular places because the locals know the clean, quality restaurants.  I also only eat during normal meal times so I don’t get old food.  Therefore, I eat NO salads unless I KNOW that the veggies have been well washed in filtered water.   I drink bottled water and even brush my teeth with it.  I also avoid drinking any water when showering.  Depending on the adventure and my access to filtered water, I may carry a water filtration system so I can drink water I can treat, or a SteriPEN.  

  • I now also bring some antibiotics just in case. My doctor recommends Cipro.
  • You can also get inoculation shots for many diseases.  Consult with a Travel Nurse (check your County Health Dept)

These are the water filtration systems I recommend. When I backpack, I prefer the Sawyer Squeeze. However, you need to clean it out REALLY well when you get home or it gets clogged. The SteriPEN weighs several ounces, so I don't backpack with it. For convenience, you may like the Life Straw.

The links above are affiliate links which means that, at no additional cost to you, I earn a small commission should you choose to purchase via them. This is a great free way for you to show your support of Active Travel Adventures and helps to cover some of my production costs. Thanks! Kit

9. I’m afraid of terrorists  

Yes, it’s a new world we live in today.  I have a couple of pieces of advice to offer regarding terrorism:

  • Check with the State Dept. I put a corresponding State Dept link on each episode’s Travel Planner.  The State Department travel website is super helpful in letting you know not only the common scams of an area, but also what degree there is, if any, of terrorist threat.  Most terrorist attacks are where there are lots of people, so you are unlikely to have an issue when you are out in nature.  That being said, when in cities, avoid staying in American hotels or hanging out where a lot of Americans do.  And never go to demonstrations, which could turn unruly.
  • Americans should sign up for the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program. Referred to as STEP, in the unlikely event of a problem, it’s nice to know that our embassy can find and help us.  Every time I travel overseas, I register my trip.  This way, if there is an attack, the US government knows to look for me.  If you are not a US citizen, check to see if your country offers a similar program.  These kinds of programs are helpful, too, for our final fear:

10. What if there’s a natural disaster? 

Yes, disasters can happen.  If your trip is logged on the STEP program,  again, the government knows to come look for you. 

 Linda in Episode 007 mentioned a Mont Blanc adventure group mate who had been been in Nepal for the earthquake.  Note that this didn’t stop this woman from going on another adventure holiday.  

 You can’t predict all natural disasters, but the scientific monitors in place now around the world are pretty good at advising about potential earthquakes, eruptions or tidal waves.  The way I look at it is that I am much more likely to be killed in a car accident at home than by any natural disaster in nature.  Hopefully if Mother Nature plans trouble, there are monitors in place to advise me to change my plans.

 So these are the Top Ten Fears  I hear from you about why folks avoid adventure travel, many of them are travel fears in general.

I hope, if you have any of these concerns, that today you’ve learned ways to mitigate these fears so that you can go forward to book and accomplish the adventure trip of your dreams.  When you return, you won’t believe how much tackling your fears will boost your confidence and give you to courage to add a +1 degree of Nervous Twitch Factor to your next epic adventure.

If I’ve missed one of your fears, be sure to email me!

Show Notes

 

 Time Stamps are for the podcast (player at the top of this page)

 

 01:10 #1 What if I can't do it?
03:22 #2 What if I get hurt?
05:27 #3 I'm worried about criminals.
08:32 #4 I'm worried that I can't speak the language.
10:43 #5 I'm worried that I have no one to travel with and I'll be lonely.
11:45 #6 I'm worried about roughing it.
12:43 #7 I'm worried I'll get lost.
15:06 #8 I'm worried I'll get sick.
17:44 #9 I'm worried about terrorists.
18:50 #10 I'm worried about natural disasters.

 

 

Previous episodes mentioned:

 

001 Nicaraagua – HIking Nicaragua's Active Volcanoes
005 Sweden's Kungsleden Trail with Rosemary Burris
007 Mont Blanc : Interview with Linda Cohen DIckens
014 Machu Picchu : Interview with Harry Dickens
015 Costa Rica

 

 Complete transcript:

 

Almost by definition, adventure travel puts you outside of your comfort zone. Frankly, I think the best experiences do. But often leaving your comfort zone brings fear and anxiety.

 Today we are going to look at the Top Ten Adventure Travel Fears that may be holding you back from adventure travelling and how to mitigate those fears, or at least live with them so they don’t hold you back.

 This is the Active Travel Adventures podcast and I am your host, Kit Parks. Ordinarily we go on an adventure to some exciting destination every other Thursday. But many of you tell me that you want to try adventure travel but you’re afraid. At that fears comes in many shapes.

 So let’s tackle these fears head on, one by one so you, too, can feel the exhilaration, confidence and empowerment that comes from adventure travel. After all, adventure travel not only gets you to places you can’t see unless you propel your body to get there, it also makes you feel so much better about yourself, as you can hear in the voices of everyone I’ve interviewed. No wonder we all got hooked! So let’s get into it.

 01:10  1. What if I can’t do it? This is definitely a good question to ask yourself. The key is to match up your abilities to an adventure. Just go +1. For example, if you’ve never hiked before, choose an adventure that has a base camp rather than a linear hike that you MUST accomplish on a set schedule. If you’ve gone on a week long hike, maybe now try a little more elevation, like I recently did climbing Chirripo in Costa Rica at 12,500’ with a 7000’ elevation gain. That was super hard for me and I wouldn’t suggest that for your first hike.

 If you’re new at this, perhaps first try something in the 3000-5000’ range and see how you do. Likewise, it wouldn’t be good for me to hike to Everest Base camp as I have some elevation issues.

 Also match how much physical endurance you want in a trip to the handy rankings I give each adventure. They are ranked 1-5 with 1 being a couch potato, 2 being easy, 3 being steady, possibly all day activity with only a few really hard parts, 4 has a lot more hard parts and is probably all day, and 5 is HARD, but not climb Mount Everest difficult. A fit person who did not train could do level 3, but would have more fun if he or she trained. 4-5 stars require training or you may not be a happy camper.

 Your training is important. Realistically look at your schedule to determine if you can do the proper training. I’ve decided to just keep doing my daily walks with 25 pounds in my backpack. And as we near backpacking season, I will beef that up to 35 pounds. There’s a great training link I’ll put in the Show Notes and on the webpage www.activetraveladventures.com/fear

 Even if you are just carrying 20 pounds, you still need to get your feet and back used to it. Can you do it without training? If you’re fit, usually, but expect high physical rated adventures to kick your butt. Truly, it’s so much better to train. You’ll have more fun.

 03:22  2. What if I get hurt? This is always a possibility. Most often people get hurt when they’ve let their guard down or are tired. At the end of the day, pay attention to lifting your feet up so you don’t trip on a root. Use trekking poles. My poles have saved me from countless falls. If you are in an area that you think you could fall, lean toward the direction you prefer to fall, so if you do, you can fall more safely, say on your butt. And like my sister, Terry, said in the last episode, “I fell. And you know what? The sky didn't fall down and I was OK. I just got a little muddy. “

 Keep a small emergency kit in your pack: a small tube of antibiotics, a bandage, bandaids, and vitamin I – ibuprophen. Also pack a compression sock in case you sprain your ankle – see the Bonus episode on What to do if you Sprain your Ankle in the Wild. I also wrap duct tape around my poles. I’ve used it to wrap my feet to reduce friction on blisters, repair tents and more.

 Finally, especially if you are traveling out of the country: buy travel insurance with evacuation coverage. It can cost $50,000-100,000 to get you and fly you out. Policy prices are based on age, country and activity. Make sure your policy covers your adventure activity. A good policy will also reimburse you if you have an accident and can’t participate in the adventure.

 I went to Tanzania with my girlfriend, Mickey. On the morning we were to start the safari, seriously right on the way breakfast, Mickey tripped and face planted. Her face got torn up and the doctor wouldn’t let her go into the bush in case it got infected. So Mickey stayed in that lovely lodge for the five days of the safari. It took a while, but she finally got reimbursed by her travel insurance company for missing the safari.

 Accidents are rare, but it’s best to be prepared.

 05:27   3. I’m afraid of criminals. In all cities of the world today, you need to take normal precautions. I put a link to the helpful State Dept travel webpage for each country in the free Travel Planners that correspond to each episode. The travel Planners are sent to you automatically if you get the newsletter – or you can download it directly from the webpage.

 Remember, on most adventures, you are rarely in a city. However, when I am in a city, here’s what I do: I keep small cash in a pocket, my passport, credit cards and big money in a hidden pouch under my clothes, and up to $50 in a purse or backpack. I never wear any flashy jewelry and if I need to get into my good stash, I do so out of sight, like in a restroom. I remember my girlfriend, Mickey, cracking up when she saw me pull out my credit card from a hidey hole pocket I had sewed into my cami. It rests against my ribcage and you can’t see that I’m hiding anything.

 Luckily, crime in the countryside is pretty much a non-issue in all of the many countries I’ve been to.

 Still I avoid putting myself in vulnerable positions such as walking alone at night when all the people have all turned in. I watch my drink at all times, etc. Just be smart and you should be fine.

 You can also join a group tour so you have safety in numbers plus have a local guide.

 One last thought on crime: I hear all the time from non-US citizens that they are afraid to come to the US because of all of the gun violence. The US is a HUGE country, the vast majority of which is completely safe from gun or any other kind of violence or serious crime. You just don’t go to the troublesome areas.

 It’s like saying it’s too dangerous to come visit me in NC because there were 20 shootings in Chicago last weekend. I live almost 1000 miles from Chicago. I can’t recall any shootings in my area, and there are a lot of guns around here. Most of the Chicago shootings are in particular neighborhoods that you just avoid. So simply do the same when travelling.

 The locals can advise you where it’s safe. For example, I was going to a dinner meetup outside Berlin. Traveling solo and not knowing the area, I asked a local if it was ok for me to be walking around by myself at 9pm after the dinner. He said the streets were fine, but that I shouldn’t cut across the park. Likewise, since I like to wander, explore and get lost in a new city, I had another local take my map of Berlin and circle the neighborhoods to avoid. I had no problems whatsoever and never felt the hairs rise – a signal I ALWAYS listen to and recommend that you do as well. Your brain has picked up a signal. Listen to it and don’t worry about making a scene if necessary.

 08:32   4. I can’t speak the local language. If you’re listening to this podcast, you are blessed to know the world’s international language. You can almost ALWAYS find someone who speaks a little English. If not, pantomimimg is fun! Or find a teenager. They often can help. You can download Google translate to your phone and use it offline. I’ll put a link on how to do it in the Show Notes and on the website.

 Take the time to learn at least “please, thank you, where’s the bathroom, yes, no, hello, goodbye”. It will endear you to the locals. YouTube is a fabulous free resource for picking up key travel phrases.

 I’m learning some Thai and Dzongkha for my upcoming trip to Bhutan. Here’s a trick I learned when I was getting my Teaching English as a Second Language certification. DRAW the phrase, the more ridiculous you make it the more memorable. For example, I am learning the Thai phrase for “Do you speak English?” Here’s how you say it: [insert You Tube]. Phonetically to my ear its: coon foot passe ingkrit dai my kha. So what I drew is a ludicris raccoon with a big foot sticking out, a large double arrow to indicate passing, the best I could come up with is knitting needles and yarn for ingkrit, a sunrise for dai and arms holding across the chest for my, and all polite females end sentences with kha, so I’m able to remember that. This is a really effective technique for someone visual like me, because I readily remember my drawing. I will put a photo of my drawing on the website. It’s a simple technique that really works!

 Alternatively, you can stick to English speaking countries or places where almost everyone speaks English. That still gives you tons of options.

 Or, you can go on a guided tour. Your guide will speak the local language and English.

 10:43   5. I don’t have anyone to travel with. PLEASE PLEASE PLEASE don’t let that stop you! Solo travelers make up a HUGE and growing portion of the adventure travel community, particularly women over 50. Whether you are single like myself or your partner doesn’t like adventure travel, you will meet plenty of fellow travelers and will often make lifelong friends. Linda and Harry of the Mont Blanc Episodes 007 and Machu Picchu Episode 014 met Phil, who was traveling solo. Phil then joined them on their trip to Machu Picchu. I met Simon on the West Highland Way last June and we still keep in touch, and he and his girlfriend have offered to show me around when I do the Cotswold Way hike.

 If you are worried you’ll be lonely, go on a guided tour. I promise you will bond with your fellow travelers. Sometimes you will have to pay a single supplement. If you don’t want to pay it, some companies will match you up with the same sex roommate.

 If you wait until you find a travel mate, you may never go. Just pick an adventure and book it! You won’t be sorry!

 11:45   6. I don’t like roughing it. No problem! Nowadays there are lots of great adventures that end each day in a comfy bed. You can use the search bar on the ATA website to narrow your options to those with the comfort level you prefer.

 Many of the adventures I’ve covered use guest houses for accommodations, so if you’re not willing to camp or staying in a mixed dorm with shared bath, simply eliminate those adventures from your list. You are NEVER going to have the time to do all of the adventures we want, so just pick accordingly.

 To help you choose, you can look at the itineraries on the website and in the Travel Planners. For example, you HAVE to camp if you want to trek the Inca Trail Episode 014. But if you hike Mont Blanc or many of the adventures I’ve covered, you sleep in a lovely guest house each night.

 Plus, on many adventures, you can arrange for someone to transport your luggage so all you need to carry is a daypack.

 12:43   7. I’m worried I’ll get lost. Did you know that you can use Google Maps offline? When I get to a new location, I ‘pin’ my accommodation so I can always find my way back home. I also carry a business card of the hotel or at least make a note of the address in my phone that I can show a cabbie if need be.

 In the wild, you need to pay attention. I recommend a guide in areas you could conceivably get lost on an unmarked trail, like in my Nicaragua adventure Episode 001. But most trails are very well marked, or ‘blazed”.

 A blaze is a symbol, like the white bar painted on trees along the Appalachian Trail or a thistle on a post along the West Highland Way. You simply follow the blazes. There should be one at every turn where there could be confusion on marked trails.

 If I come to an intersection and am not sure which way to go, I do two things. First, I choose a direction and then make a mark on the trail with rocks and/or sticks to indicate which direction I plan to go. Then I turn around to see what the trail looks like behind me and look at the trail indicator I just made. So if I decide later that I guessed wrong, which is generally happens in less than 100 yards, I turn around and can readily find my intersection again so I can head the other way. You would be surprised how often you can miss a fork when you come from a different direction, so my method helps me to self-correct and not miss the turn off.

 Also there aren’t many popular trails these days that you won’t see other people. If you’re really concerned about getting lost, purposefully CHOOSE a popular one and then in the popular direction, not like Rosemary Burris in Episode 005 who went in the opposite direction of most folks hiking the Kungsleden Trail so that she could have the trail to herself for much of the day.

 There are also great map apps you can put on your phone. But as a backup, I also always carry a compass and a paper map in case my phone dies. If the paper map is not waterproof, I make it so by watering down some Elmer’s Glue and paint over it completely. Once dry, I turn it over and repeat on the other side. When both sides are dry, sprinkle them with baby powder to help keep the map from sticking when you fold it. This technique works on Xerox copies as well.

 It’s also smart to put a whistle on your pack and carry a headlamp.

 15:06   8. I’m worried I’ll get sick. It happens. You eat something that disagrees with you. I pack a couple of Oral Rehydration packet to help with rehydration, and gratefully I’ve never had to use them. You just mix the packet with water so you aren’t carrying around water weight.

 I am careful about what I eat and drink, especially in second or third world countries.

 In those countries, I only eat cooked food, fruits I can peel, and eat at popular places because the locals know the clean, quality restaurants. I also only eat during normal meal times so I don’t get old food. Therefore, I eat NO salads unless I KNOW that the veggies have been well washed in filtered water. I drink bottled water and even brush my teeth with it. I also avoid drinking any water when showering. Depending on the adventure and my access to filtered water, I may carry a water filtration system so I can drink water I can treat, or a SteriPen. I often trust springs if there isn’t any livestock grazing in the area, and try not to drink out of rivers or lakes when possible.

 Back when I was learning to backpack, I had what I thought was a great idea. I would train my body to get used to the stuff in untreated water. So I purposefully drank untreated water from a river in westen NC. I foolishly thought that I could build up an immunity like locals do in foreign countries. I got giardia. I didn’t realize giardia is a parasite. It took antibiotics to get rid of it. I now also bring some antibiotics just in case. My doctor recommends Cipro.

 Yes, there’s a chance you can get diarrhea, but you can mitigate this risk with some simple precautions and if you bring some powdered electrolytes and a prescription for Cipro, an antibiotic. You can also get inoculation shots for many diseases, and I’ve taken about all of them.

 Don’t let fear if getting sick keep you at home! Take recommended precautions and consider visiting a travel nurse to review what you should do. My local county health department offers this service or there are Travel Clinics in cities you can find on Google. Be sure to keep good records of your innoculations.

 17:44   9. I’m afraid of terrorists. Yes, it’s a new world we live in today. I have a couple of pieces of advice to offer regarding terrorism:

a. Check with the State Dept. I put a corresponding State Dept link on each episode’s Travel Planner. The State Department travel website is super helpful in letting you know not only the common scams of an area, but also what degree there is, if any, of terrorist threat. Most terrorist attacks are where there are lots of people, so you are unlikely to have an issue when you are out in nature. That being said, when in cities, avoid staying in American hotels or hanging out where a lot of Americans do. And never go to demonstrations, which could turn unruly.
b. Americans should sign up for the Smart Traveler Enrollment Program. Referred to as STEP, in the unlikely event of a problem, it’s nice to know that our embassy can find and help us. Every time I travel overseas, I register my trip. This way, if there is an attack, the US government knows to look for me. If you are not a US citizen, check to see if your country offers a similar program. These kinds of programs are helpful, too, for our final fear:

 18:50   10. What if there’s a natural disaster? Yes, disasters can happen. If your trip is logged on the STEP program, again, the government knows to come look for you.

 Linda in Episode 007 mentioned a Mont Blanc adventure group mate who had been in Nepal for the earthquake. Note that this didn’t stop this woman from going on another adventure holiday. My Nicaraguan guide was guiding a trip up Telica in 2015 when the already active volcano decided it was a good day to spew out just a bit more. When they heard new noises, they just ran and they and everyone else in the area was safe.

 You can’t predict all natural disasters, but the scientific monitors in place now around the world are pretty good at advising about potential earthquakes, eruptions or tidal waves. The way I look at it is that I am much more likely to be killed in a car accident at home than by any natural disaster in nature. Hopefully if Mother Nature plans trouble, there are monitors in place to advise me to change my plans.

 This is what happened on my recent adventure to Costa Rica. Due to volcanic activity, we couldn’t climb to the top of the Turrialba volcano. Scientists’ monitors indicated that it would not be wise, so authorities closed access. On the Costa Rica Episode 15 webpage, I have a really cool video of the apocalyptic scene at the highest point we were allowed. There is no vegetation…just blackened tree trunks and gasses spewing from the ground. Eerily cool.

 So these are the Top Ten Fears I hear from you about why folks avoid adventure travel, many of them are travel fears in general.

 I hope, if you have any of these concerns, that today you’ve learned ways to mitigate these fears so that you can go forward to book and accomplish the adventure trip of your dreams. When you return, you won’t believe how much tackling your fears will boost your confidence and give you to courage to add a +1 degree of Nervous Twitch Factor to your next epic adventure.

 If I’ve missed one of your fears, be sure to write me at Kit@ActiveTravelAdventures.com. Or please, just write me anyway and tell me what you think of the program or to offer suggestions. I really love hearing from you! If you wouldn’t mind me calling you to ask you a few questions about this podcast, include your phone number in your email.

 Oh! I have some exciting news for you! Several of the folks I’ve interviewed said trekking Nepal is right up there as their favorite adventure. Until my recent interview with Janet, I thought this adventure was only for hard core, high altitude super hikers. I didn’t think it was something I could do, particularly since I am a bit altitude challenged.

 And remember, even though Nepal is the land of Mount Everest, I don’t cover any crazy dangerous adventures on the ATA podcast. After researching Nepal, I wouldn’t even include Everest Base Camp on this show, because it’s too hard and high. So I was thrilled to learn that there IS an adventure in Nepal that I can do. And if I can do it, so can you.

 So in two weeks, I’ll be back with Janet Hanpeter, who will tell us about her adventure trekking Nepal at a lower altitude which makes it doable and so that you still get to see all the beauty and get to feel the Nepal trekking vibe, but without killing yourself on a death march in high altitude. I can’t wait for you to hear it! Be sure to subscribe so you don’t miss it.

 Until then, Adventure On!

 

 

 

Creative Commons License
Conquer the Top Ten Fears of Adventure Travel by Kit Parks, Active Travel Adventures is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 4.0 International License.
Based on a work at http://activetraveladventures.com.
Permissions beyond the scope of this license may be available at http://activetraveladventures.com/contact-us/.